Breed Description

We specialize in a RARE breed from Mediterranean descent, believed to be of Bichon lineage. The Coton de Tulear have a fantastic history, almost something of a fairy tale!​

We are excited to share our lovely breed with everyone.  They are  the sweetest little dogs, with wonderful personalities, gorgeous non-shedding coats, and the most precious little faces you can ever imagine.

 


Coton de Tulear Information and History

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Coton de Tulear, pronounced "Coe-TAWN- day-too--lee-are," means "cotton of Tulear."  The Coton is a rare, ancient pure-breed that originated on Madagascar more than three centuries ago. The Coton was exclusively the dog of Royal Malagasy nobles, but now this exceptional, elegant companion is available to a select few outside that legendary land.

 

We have two generations of breeding experience behind our Coton de Tulear puppies.

Lucy and Bear Graduating from Obedience Training!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A Clown-like Disposition

The Coton is bred to and raised to be strictly a companion dog.  Because of their delightful personalities, small size, dark eyes, long lashes, and super charm, they are said to sometimes actually smile!  The breed is not known to be vicious, but needs to be socialized at an early age due to shyness in some puppies.  They bond easily to the humans in their lives, and are lovingly referred to as, "Little Clowns" due to their playful demeanor.  Probably the most outstanding characteristic of the Coton de Tulear is its behavior. The Coton is a "companion dog," bred for the pure delight of its intelligent, loving attention to its human family. It is very intelligent, and studies its human family with great care. The Coton is an alert, lively companion, but it is slow to anger. Most Cotons bark seldom, although some will act as alarm clocks and guard dogs.


Coton Standard and Size 

The Coton de Tulear earned its name from its unique, cotton-like hair, and for a port city in Madagascar, Tulear.  Its dry, wind-tossed coat is probably the easiest to maintain of any long-haired breed, but it still requires regular grooming. The hair is about four-to-six inches long, dries quickly when wet, and requires relatively little brushing. It sheds very little, and most people find Cotons to be hypoallergenic, and they  rarely bother people who suffer from chronic allergies.  The Coton usually stand from around 10-12 inches and weigh from 8 -15 pounds.  The body is rectangular and the back line should be slightly convex.  The head is triangular and rather small.  

                                                                     

Color

Coton de Tulear puppies are often born with color that fades as the puppy reaches adulthood. Patches of cream, black and brown, notably on the ears and allowed usually on no more than 1/3 of the body hair, are often seen are permissible.  However, the Coton should be predominantly white by the time it reaches adulthood.
 

Perfect Companions

Cotons are hearty dogs and, with acclimation, frolic in desert heat and winter snow. However, the Coton is strictly an indoor dog. The breed is extremely healthy, long-lived, and, in the North American population of Cotons, the breed has no known genetic defects. They live about 16 years; the oldest survived for almost 19 years.

Cotons and your family

Cotons are calm, sturdy dogs, most of whom enjoy the well-intentioned rough-housing of children. Cotons enjoy most household pets including other dogs and cats. A Coton may cock its head attentively when spoken to, smile, and stand or walk on its hind legs to please its human family. Cotons are easily trained.

Recommended Reading:
Coton De Tulear: Special Rare Breed Edition
by Wolfgang Knorr
Published by Kennel Club Books
ISBN: 1-59378-354-X

Havanese
by Zoila Portuondo Guerra
Published by Kennel Club Books
ISBN: 1-59378-217-9
 
Puppy Training
by Charlotte Schwartz
Published by Kennel Club Books
ISBN 1-59378-365-5
 
Better Dog Behavior
by Charlotte Schwartz
Published by Kennel Club Books
ISBN 1-59378-379-5